August 1

7 Tips to Improve Sales Follow-up & Close More Leads

Marketing Strategy

3  comments

If you are like most B2B marketers, lead generation is at top of your priority list. But as you may already know, generating tons of “leads” doesn’t guarantee sales will follow.

Does the sales team either ignore your hard-won leads or complain about their quality? Do you ever wonder was the lead even contacted? If so, what’s the status?  Could you have helped move it along by going deeper in the sales cycle?

This chronic lack of visibility has a snowball effect of making it challenging for marketers to measure their effectiveness and understand their return on marketing investment (ROMI). So what can be done about it? 

Here’s 7 Tips to Improve Sales Follow-up

  1. Get buy in from sales team on your "sales ready" lead definition
  2. Provide qualification information for each sales lead
  3. Qualify and Distribute sales ready leads immediately
  4. Communicate hand off to sales person
  5. Measure sales pursuit – If lead not followed up it will be pulled / reassigned
  6. Regularly close the loop -what gets measured gets done
  7. Sales management must also audit and track rep follow-up

How often do you close the loop? I’ve found the most powerful way to improve sales follow-up on marketing generated leads is doing more frequent sales and marketing huddles.

Read Collaboration Huddles and 35 Other Ways to Improve Sales and Marketing Teamwork

Finally, if you’re using these tips already and still feel that your marketing and sales teams are working against each other instead of being on the same team, you could have some challenges with office politics read on.

MarketingSherpa just published an interview with Marketo CEO Phil Fernandez from a marketing view point and Barry Trailer, Co-Founder, CSO Insights who brings a sales perspective. Together Phil and Barry share seven other strategies to get both sides talking including how to:

  • Model the sales/marketing funnel
  • Develop a common vocabulary
  • Create a closed-loop reporting process

MarketingSherpa: Overcoming Office Politics – 7 Strategies to Generate & Close More Leads.

Related posts:

Closed Loop Feedback: The Missing Lead Generation Huddle
Closed-Loop Marketers More Likely to Reach ROMI Goals

Podcast: Using Closed Loop Feedback to Boost Lead Generation ROI

About the author 

Brian Carroll

Brian Carroll is the CEO and founder of markempa, helping companies to convert more customers with empathy-based marketing. He is the author of the bestseller, Lead Generation for the Complex Sale and founded B2B Lead Roundtable LinkedIn Group with 20,301+ members.

  1. Brian,
    I think that software currently being developed confirms what you say about the need to close the loop. Demand generation suites are becoming more and more popular and most of them try to help marketers gets feedback from Sales as well as Marketing ROI in order to improve on the quality of marketing campaigns. But of course it’s still crucial to have good communication between Marketing and Sales.

  2. Brian,
    I think that your posts clearly explains the important steps required for lead follow-up. I think that an important factor is the enabling technology that can help facilitate the process. It would be great for you to comment on the CRM solutions and how to leverage their capabilities to improve this process.
    – David Gearhart
    http://www.enterprisesoftwareexec.com

  3. I agree with you that their needs to be close collaboration between the teleprospecting (aka inside sales) team and the field sales team. This is why I advocate Step 6 “closed loop feedback” which requires collaboration and regular team meetings. At my company we call them “huddles.”

    The following link describes some of things we accomplish in those meetings
    https://www.markempa.com/collaboration_w/

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